For the first time, scientists capture electron movements inside a solar cell


The schematic depicts the time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy instrumentation that allowed the Femtosecond Spectroscopy Unit to visualize electron movements. The 800nm pump pulse (red) excites electrons while the weaker 266nm probing pulse (blue) allows for different measurements of electron movements to be taken. Credit: Michael Man

Ever since J.J. Thompson’s 1897 discovery of the electron, scientists have attempted to describe the subatomic particle’s motion using a variety of different means. Electrons are far too small and fast to be seen, even with the help of a light microscope. This has made measuring an electron’s movement very difficult for the past century. However, new research from the Femtosecond Spectroscopy Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and…



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