Children who have lost a parent twice as likely to have tried tobacco or alcohol before teens


Children who grow up without one of their parents are more likely to smoke or drink by the age of 11 (stock photo)

Children who grow up without one of their parents are more likely to smoke or drink by the age of 11 (stock photo)

Children who grow up without one of their parents are more likely to smoke or drink by the age of 11, a British study found.

Researchers following thousands of children in the UK found those who had ‘lost’ a parent – either through death or separation – were twice as like to smoke and nearly 50 per cent more likely to have tried alcohol before they were in their teens.

The University College London study analysed data from thousands of British children born between 2000 and 2002, who were questioned at three, five, seven and 11 years old.

At 11, they were asked whether they had ever tried smoking or drinking and whether they had ever had enough alcohol to feel drunk.

More than one in four of the 10,940 children who completed the surveys had ‘lost’ a parent…



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