A 'Satnav' for the brain can help detect faulty signals 


Half a million Britons have epilepsy — a condition that can seriously disrupt patients’ lives — but a new way of mapping the brain could make surgery more effective and suitable for more patients. 

Mother-of-one Katie Beck, 33, from Kelso, Scotland had the operation, as she tells CAROL DAVIS.

THE PATIENT

When I was ten, I was huddled around a school computer with my friends and suddenly my right hand started to lift and rotate above my head as if I was waving — it was very strange.

It happened once or twice a day after that but I’d get a sensation like goosebumps first, so I’d have time to leave the room before anyone noticed. 

Mother-of-one Katie Beck, 33, from Kelso, Scotland is one of the first to try the new brain-mapping technique

Mother-of-one Katie Beck, 33, from Kelso, Scotland is one of the first to try the new brain-mapping technique

It was three weeks before a teacher spotted it and called my mother who took me to A&E.

I was diagnosed with epilepsy, where…



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